Aviation museums, airports, flights

Aviation through the eyes of a traveler

B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber. Rahimi M.Koch museum, Istanbul

This remains of the us bomber raised from the seabed near Antalya. This is one of the aircraft involved in the RAID of 1 August 1943 Ploesti. Operation "Tidal wave" (Tidal Wave) has completely failed and subsequently was called by pilots as "black Sunday".

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

Romanian oilfields and refineries were the main source of liquid fuel for Germany, therefore, become one of the most important targets for allied aircraft. Although the first attack was made June 23, 1941, for two years, and failed not to interrupt, but even to reduce the supply of gasoline and other petroleum products to the enemy. In the summer of 1943 it was decided to solve the problem radically, utilizing a large number of aircraft that are concentrated in North Africa.  1 Aug airfield in Benghazi in Libya has risen 177 bombers B-24 and five groups at low altitude headed towards Northern Greece, where had to turn towards Romania.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

the Thing went wrong from the very beginning - the plane-the leader with the main Navigator fell into the sea, and the liberator of the second Navigator was forced to return to base for technical reasons.Over Greece the aircraft got into bad weather which hampered navigation, bringing the two groups instead of ploieşti went to Bucharest. Finding error, the majority dropped their bombs on the first available target and turned back, only 6 aircraft finally made its way to the oil fields and bombed on purpose. The remaining three waves came out just to Ploiesti, but faced with waiting for them fully armed with air defense for the time of flight of bombers over the Balkans, the Germans received comprehensive data about the course and strength of the enemy. As a result of attacks of fighters and antiaircraft fire, the Americans lost 41 aircraft over the target, but the defeat is not over - the Luftwaffe fighters pursued them on the way back, shooting down 13 aircraft. Returned to the base 88 aircraft, of which only 33 had no significant damage. Part of the downed bombers made an emergency landing in Turkey kept neutral, and were interned. The loss of crews was huge: 310 airmen killed, 108 captured in enemy territory, and 78 interned in Turkey. The RAID performance distillation plants fell by 40%, but in Germany were 60% of total volumes, which continued to be shipped. And after a few weeks the work of plants has been restored almost completely. I must say that the Yankees did not lose heart, and after a year's supply of fuel in Germany is still stopped. The victory was the Americans not cheap - in total, ploieşti was achieved 7500 sorties and lost 350 bombers.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

liberator and 98 bomber group, U.S. air force, worn on Board the inscription "Hadley's Harlem" ("Hadley from Harlem" - named after captain Gilbert Hadley) attack fighter suffered serious damage and was trying to hold on to the British base in Cyprus, but fell into the sea off the coast of Antalya. In 1995, all that remains of the Liberator, was raised and brought to the Museum by Rahimi Koch. The nose of the aircraft was restored with the active participation of the survivors of the crew member - gunner Leroy Newton.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

wing broke off when it hit the water.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

somehow most affected trailing edge of the wing.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

the Plane had 4 engines Pratt & Whitney R-1830-33 Twin Wasp.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

two-row radial engines of 30 litres had 14 cylinders and developed a capacity of 1200 HP.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

Well preserved cockpit.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

A glazed nose, the location of the Navigator, is completely absent. br>

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

Climbing up the ladder, you can look into the cockpit.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

the seat of the commander is not brongespeense, as the armor protected the whole cabin.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

From electrical equipment was almost nothing left.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

Oxygen cylinders.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

B-24 had a ceiling of 8,500 meters, long flights at high altitudes demanded a large supply of oxygen for breathing.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

Immediately behind the cockpit is a plexiglass dome top turret installation "Bendix". The firing point was a remote control, aiming was carried out using a complex periscope system that gives shooters a lot of trouble.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

2 Brownig M2 machine gun caliber 12.7 mm (.50") have the ammunition 400 rounds per gun.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

To reduce the drag of the turret hiding in the fuselage and was nominated only during reflection of attacks of fighters.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber

Central part of the fuselage is completely missing, apparently, completely destroyed. Little remains of the tail.

Istanbul, Rahimi M. Koch museum. B-24D Liberator 'Hadley's Harlem' bomber