'Caravelle' Sud Aviation SE 210, passenger jet (Le Bourget)

This aircraft became not only a symbol of the revival of France as a great aviation power, but also became a trendsetter in the layout of passenger aircraft for the next two decades. The Caravelle was one of the first passenger aircraft with jet engines, it made its first flight in 1955, and three years later it began commercial operation. The main feature of the aircraft was the placement of engines in the tail section, rather than in the wing or under the wing, as in competitors (Boeing-707, Comet, Tu-104), which significantly reduced the noise in the passenger cabin. After the Caravelle this scheme for a long time became standard for small and medium-capacity aircraft. Another innovation was a folding ladder in the tail section, making it possible to perform flights from provincial airfields, where there were no mobile ladders for large aircraft. Advanced was also electronic equipment for navigation and communication, and in 1963 in the cockpit appeared autopilot, capable of landing in automatic mode.

Sud Aviation SE 210 Caravelle

The Caravelle was designed for medium-and short-haul lines, could accommodate up to 100 people, and flew at a cruising speed of 750 km/h. The plane worked in almost fifty countries around the World, even managed to break into the USA air transport market, where 20 cars were sold. More than 10 countries used the Caravelle as a carrier of heads of state. The issue of delivery of several cars to the Soviet airlines Aeroflot traditionally closed to foreign manufacturers was discussed, one of the planes made an advertising tour of the airports of the USSR in the livery of Aeroflot, but the contract was never concluded. The Caravelle was exceptionally reliable, because its insurance fees were lower than for other types of aircraft. In 45 years of commercial operation there has not been a single crash or serious accident due to technical reasons.

Sud Aviation SE 210 Caravelle

At the site of the Museum of Aviation and Cosmonautics presented the Caravelle last 12 series, under the factory number 272 (total produced 283). The aircrafts of this series had an extended fuselage by 3.5 meters, accommodating 140 passengers. The aircraft was built in early 1972 and worked for the Danish airline Sterling Airways, 10 years later returned to France and operated from Air Inter, in 1991 continued to work at Air Provence International, and in the spring of 1997 made its last landing at Le Bourget airport and became a Museum exhibit.

Sud Aviation SE 210 Caravelle