Douglas DC-3 'Dakota' passenger plane (Rahimi M.Koch museum)

This aircraft was built at a factory in Oklahoma city in March 1944 for the United States air force. At the end of the war and the subsequent sale for a song of unnecessary equipment, transport 'Dakota' was purchased by the Ford concern and converted for corporate purposes. Just a year later, it was owned by another automaker - General motors, where it was operated for almost 10 years.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

In 1967, the airplane was sold to the University of Nebraska, where it worked until 1971. After that, the plane wandered to different owners, until, in the late 70s, it is unknown what ways it ended up in the air force of Yugoslavia.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Ten years later, in August 1989, the tiny Turkish company NESU AIR (Nesu Air Havayollari) became its owner, where the aircraft received its current tail number TC-ALI. In the same year, the company went bankrupt and the veteran quietly rotted away unknown where, until in July 2001, it was installed in the Rahmi M. Kocha Museum over a replica of the Air France pavilion of the first building of the Istanbul airport.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Let's go up the ramp,

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

And look at the salon of "Douglas".

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Inside the cabin there are a few seats, sitting in which you can watch a short film about the history of the creation and operation of the world's most common aircraft.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

There is also a stand with technical documentation for the operation of the airplane.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Scheme of the landing gear service points.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Instructions for the equipment of the pilot's cabin.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Flight documents: landing approach scheme in Erzurum.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Champion engine spark plugs are one of the most important parts, their quality largely determined the smooth operation of Pratt & Whitney R-1830 engines.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

These were the standards of salons for VIP passengers in the 50s-60s of the 20th century.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

The design of the seats is simple, but it seemed more comfortable to sit in them than in modern liners. However, this can only be determined after sitting for a considerable time, it may immediately seem convenient, but not the fact that you will not experience the same sensations after an hour of sitting.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Canvas folding seat, just a pillow on it, a massive armrest.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Air conditioning and lighting - one for two seats.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

The standard military "Douglas", which is this device, had a compartment in the tail for storing covers, the toilet appeared as a result of re-equipment. It is interesting that until the 60s, many airplane toilets did not have special fecal containers, the products of life were simply removed from the plane. On high-altitude aircraft, the fan tube was provided with a double valve to prevent depressurization. Such systems were even on the Soviet airplane TU-104 and the first models of Il-18.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

To the right of the toilet is a very small galley, an indispensable attribute of a modern passenger plane.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Access to the cockpit is limited by a glass partition, but it is possible to get acquainted with it in all its details.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Captain's wheel.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Co-pilot's wheel. Many instruments are missing, perhaps at the end of its career, the plane served as a donor for its fellows.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Engine and propeller pitch controls.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Radar. On Soviet clones of Douglas-Lee-2, it was not in sight. As, however, on the Il-14.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Automatic radio compass control panels (ADF), between them a VHF navigation radio station (VHF NAV).

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Electrical distribution panels: switches for instrument panels and radio equipment, navigation lights.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Ammeters of electric generators of the right and left engines.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Next to the plane, you can see some airfield equipment from the middle of the last century, which belonged to the ground handling company Çelebi Holding.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

Generator for starting the engines. It was used in order not to waste the charge of aircraft batteries.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

The fuel tanker is not comparable to the current 30-ton tanks, but the Douglas for full refueling was just under 800 liters and such a car could fill 3-4 aircraft.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum

The boarding ramp with an electric drive.

Douglas DC-3 'Dakota', Rahmi M.Koç Museum